Canada NWT Laptop Not Encrypted Because It’s “Very Difficult To Encrypt”.

Approximately two weeks ago, Canada’s cbc.com reported on the theft of a government laptop with promises of more articles on the same in the weeks to come. Earlier this week, the last article was posted. The story is a doozy. To summarize, an employee with the Department of Health and Social Services (Northwest Territories, Canada) […] read more

California Looking To Label Biometric Data As “Personal Information”.

California was the first state in the US to pass a data breach notification law, all the way back in 2003. In the intervening fifteen years, all states have passed similar laws. The federal government has repeatedly attempted to pass one as well, so far without success. The need for federal legislation, one that would […] read more

Indiana Supreme Court To Judge If Government Can Force People To Decrypt Their Smartphones.

The issue of forced smartphone decryptions, as it pertains to Constitutionally protected rights, is gathering steam. According to various sites, Indiana’s Supreme Court will soon be listening to arguments on whether Fifth Amendment rights are being violated when the government forces suspects to unlock their encrypted smartphones (the Indiana Court of Appeals judged that it […] read more

Judge Says Biometric Locks Protected By 5th Amendment.

The battle over privacy in the digital age ratcheted up last week. According to a California judge, the Fifth Amendment – the right not to incriminate oneself – protects people from being forced to bypass a smartphone’s encryption via the use of irises, fingerprints, facial recognition, and other similar methods. Obviously, this means a warrant […] read more

Convicted Terrorist Steals Hard Drive in Brussels Main Justice Offices.

According to the Associated Press, a man who was convicted (and released from prison) for terrorist activities is suspected in the theft of an external hard drive from a forensic doctor’s office. The story is full of puzzling questions, including why the Belgian government is not doing an adequate job of securing their data. Motives […] read more

Scathing Government Report Concludes 2017 Equifax Breach Entirely Preventable.

This week, the US government published a report on the massive data breach Equifax experienced last year.  The overall conclusion shared by the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee is that the data breach – the largest one todate in US history and the foreseeable future – was entirely preventable.  However, as one reads through […] read more

Those NSA Tools Being Auctioned? One Should Blame USB Disks, Apparently.

We don’t hear anymore from the “old school” types of data breaches: lost or stolen laptops, computers that were stolen during a break-in, USB flashdrives that disappeared, etc. The last memorable case – now two years ago – involved a doctor who was tied to a tree by a couple of thugs and ordered to […] read more

Longer Passwords Is The Way To Security.

In a continuation to the post from last week, it looks like it’s not only the FTC’s Chief Technologist that is waging war against the periodic renewal of passwords. The National Institute of Science and Technology (NIST) is apparently onboard as well, and they will also be recommending that something be done about password complexity […] read more

Frequent Password Changes Not A Secure Data Security Practice.

According to the Federal Trade Commission’s Chief Technologist, forcing users to frequently change their password can be counterproductive when it comes to fighting data breaches. Mind you, it’s not the frequency itself that leads to security weaknesses. Rather, it’s what happens at the weakest link in most security systems — individual behavior — that leads […] read more

Sharing Passwords is Hacking, Which is a Federal Crime.

The controversies regarding cyberspace just keep burning brightly. In the past couple of weeks, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the unauthorized sharing and use of passwords can be deemed as hacking, and thus can be a violation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA). As noted by motherboard.vice.com and others, this […] read more