Seattle University Alerts Over 2000 Faculty & Staff Of Lost Laptop.

Seattle University announced a couple of weeks ago that an unencrypted laptop was lost while an employee was “commuting on the bus.” An IT investigation drew the conclusion that “an offline email cache file” contained Social Security numbers and other personal information for 2,102 current and former faculty, staff, and dependents. The story feels like […] read more

UK’s National Cyber Security Centre Publishes List of Commonly Used Passwords.

A blast from the past, from the 1990s to the early noughts to be more specific, made the news this week, courtesy of the National Cyber Security Centre in the United Kingdom. According to an analysis by the government organization, blink182 is among the most commonly used passwords in the world. This means that it’s […] read more

Verizon Tries To Settle Yahoo Data Breach For the Second Time.

Verizon, which acquired Yahoo in 2016 and renamed the business twice since (Oath, followed by Verizon Media), is attempting to settle the massive data breach the purple company admitted to shortly before being bought out. In January of this year, a settlement of $50 million was rejected by Judge Koh of the US District Court […] read more

California Looking To Label Biometric Data As “Personal Information”.

California was the first state in the US to pass a data breach notification law, all the way back in 2003. In the intervening fifteen years, all states have passed similar laws. The federal government has repeatedly attempted to pass one as well, so far without success. The need for federal legislation, one that would […] read more

Judge Says Biometric Locks Protected By 5th Amendment.

The battle over privacy in the digital age ratcheted up last week. According to a California judge, the Fifth Amendment – the right not to incriminate oneself – protects people from being forced to bypass a smartphone’s encryption via the use of irises, fingerprints, facial recognition, and other similar methods. Obviously, this means a warrant […] read more

Leading Self-Encrypting Drives Compromised, Patched.

Earlier this week, security researchers revealed that certain SEDs (self-encrypting drives) sold by some of the leading brands in the consumer data storage industry had flaws in its full disk encryption.   Bad Implementation One of the easiest ways to protect one’s data is to use full disk encryption (FDE). As the name implies, FDE […] read more

Google and Google+ : Data Breach or Not?.

This week’s revelation that Google covered up a data breach connected to Google+, the much-unused Facebook-competitor, has spilled a lot of digital ink. Unsurprisingly, most of it is unsympathetic to Google. One exception was an article at theverge.com, where it noted that “the breach that killed Google+ wasn’t a breach at all.” And, on the […] read more

Anthem Data Breach Settled for $115M, Despite Having “Reasonable” Security.

Last week, a federal judge approved a settlement – the largest to date when it comes to data breaches – that is historic and yet falls flat: Anthem, the Indianapolis-based insurer, has agreed to pay a total of $115 million to settle all charges related to its 2015 data breach. The breach, strongly believed to […] read more

Yahoo Penalized £250,000 By UK Information Commissioner’s Office.

It was reported this week that the United Kingdom’s Information Commissioner – the person whose department is in charge of upholding the nation’s data privacy laws – has penalized Yahoo! UK Services Limited with the amount of £250,000. The penalty is in response to the global data breach Yahoo experienced, and hid, for over two […] read more