Delaware Updates Data Breach Notification Rules.

Delaware, the second-smallest state but the leader in business incorporations, at least within the USA, has updated its legal framework regarding data breach notifications. Beginning on August 14, 2018, companies that experience a data breach must notify any affected individuals in Delaware within 60 days. In addition, credit monitoring – free of charge, of course […] read more

NIST Guy Who Came Up With Hair-Tearing Password Requirements Says He’s Sorry.

The “NIST midlevel manager” who came up with the crazy password requirements – well, technically, recommendations. You know, must include special characters, uppercase and lower case letters, alphanumeric – says that he’s sorry and that “much of what [he] did [he] now regret[s].” As the Wall Street Journal explains, Bill Burr was a manager at […] read more

Schools In EU Could Face Heavy Fines For Data Breaches.

Beginning in May 2018, schools in EU member countries (including the UK despite Brexit) must comply with the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). Not doing so would mean they could be subject up to 4% of their turnover, a figure that created quite the buzz when it was announced for businesses earlier this year […] read more

UK ICO to SMEs: Data Protection Laws Apply to You.

The United Kingdom’s Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) has slapped Boomerang Video Ltd. (BV), a company that rents out video games, with a £60,000 fine. The monetary penalty is the result of a 2014 data breach in which personal details of 26,000 people were stolen. The fine deserves another look because BV’s data breach was the […] read more

Louisville Hall of Justice Computer Stolen And Recovered, Hard Drive Still Missing.

There are reports out of Kentucky that a computer being used at the Louisville Hall of Justice has been stolen. The notable thing about this story, however, is that the computer was eventually recovered. Even more notable: the recovered computer was missing its hard drive. This small fact can be interpreted in many ways, but […] read more

Target Settles With 47 Attorneys General Over 2013 Hack.

One of the biggest hacks in history was the Target credit hack of winter 2013, which affected approximately 60 million people. Four years later, Target is finally putting the situation behind, settling legal action brought to it by 47 states. The amount: $18.5 million. This does not include the many millions the Minnesota-based retailer paid […] read more

Global Malware Emergency Shows Why Backdoors Are Dangerous.

The big data security news this week is, of course, the WannaCry ransomware situation that reared its head last Friday, continued to grow over the weekend, and threatened to really become something had it not been for a serendipity: a kill-switch, possibly a mistake, baked into the malware. Many organizations and traditional news outlets have […] read more

Sextortion Case Treads A Well-Worn Path: Are Passwords Protected Under the Fifth?.

A case of “sextortion” – blackmailing someone over naked footage (digital footage, more specifically, to reflect the times we live in) – between Instagram celebs has again dredged up the decidedly non-superfluous legal quagmire that’s been repeatedly visited since at least 2009: Is forcing a defendant to spit out his or her password a violation […] read more

HIPAA/HITECH Doesn’t Require You To Be Perfect, But It Does Expect You To Follow The Rules.

A couple of recent Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) legal settlements emphasize paperwork over security, showing that a healthcare entity’s approach to safeguarding data must be holistic: yes, you need to use encryption, and lock doors, and hide screens from potential medical data peeping-toms…but you also need to make sure that you’ve followed […] read more